Yacon, Marijuana, Flowers and Vegetables: Not The Usual Sources of Wine

Yacon, Marijuana, Flowers and Vegetables: Not The Usual Sources of Wine

Most wines are made from fruits (like grapes, apples and many others), rice and sugar cane.

Most wines are made from fruits (like grapes, apples and many others), rice and sugar cane. Unknown to many, some wine can be made also from vegetables, flowers, roots and others.

Marijuana

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Quite unusual but extract of Cannabis which is commonly known as Marijuana can be fermented to produce wine. Although the most common form of cannabis used as a drug is the natural herbal form.

Yacon

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Another peculiar source of wine is the Yacon, a root crop that is grown in the Andes Mountains, particularly in Peru. It’s a crisp and sweet-tasting tuber with texture and flavor that have been described as a cross between a fresh apple and watermelon which is why it is sometimes referred to as the apple of the earth. It has recently been introduced to the Philippines and is now widely available in markets. One province in the Philippines that produces Yacon wine is Nueva Vizcaya in northern Luzon. Yacon also provides for two nutritional products the yacon syrup and yacon tea. Both products are popular among diabetic people and dieters who consume these products because of its low sugar properties.

Honey

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Another unusual source of wine is honey and the alcoholic beverage that is made from honey and water through fermentation with yeast is called Mead. The alcoholic content of Mead may range from that of mild ale to that of a strong wine.

Potato

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Potatoes are the world’s 4th largest food crop and yes, potatoes are not just for fries, mash and chips. Potatoes are also used to brew alcoholic beverages. And do you know that the popular “vodka” is made from potatoes?

Carrot

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One of the best sources of essential vitamin called beta-carotene is carrot, a root vegetable that is usually orange in color. Other color variations of carrot include purple, red, white, or yellow. It has a crisp texture when fresh. The edible part of a carrot is a taproot. Extract of carrots can be fermented to produce wine.

Parsnip

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Another root vegetable aside from carrot whose extract can be fermented to produce wine is parsnip. Parsnips resemble carrots, but are paler than most of them and have a stronger flavor. Like carrots, parsnips are native to Eurasia and have been eaten there since ancient times.

Rhubarb

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Rhubarb can also be used to make wine. This plant is also called Turkish celery. Rhubarb is a group of plants that belong to the genus Rheum that grow from thick short rhizomes and have large leaves that are somewhat triangular in shaped. The leaves of this plant are toxic but the stalks are used in pies and other foods for their tart flavor.

Peapod

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Botanically speaking, Peapod is considered a fruit but treated as vegetable in cooking. It is a cool season crop grown in many parts of the world that can be made into wine. Peapod is used as a vegetable – fresh, frozen or canned, and is also grown to produce dry peas like the split pea.

Elderberry

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There are also some plant species whose flowers can be made into wine like Sambucus which is also known as Elder or Elderberry. This plant is endemic to temperate-to-subtropical regions of the world. Wines, cordials and marmalade have been produced from the berries.

Dandelion

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Another plant whose flower extract can be fermented also to make wine is the Dandelion, a plant which is considered a weed. This unique plant is endemic to Europe and Asia.

Hibiscus

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Medicinally and commercially speaking, the flowers of Hibiscus have so many uses. Its extract can be fermented also to make wine. The flowers are also used to add flavor to the end of year punch, along with many other plants as cinnamon, guava and sugar cane.

See also

 

15 Popular Drinks From Around the World You Probably Haven’t Tasted Yet

 

How To Make Fruit Wine

 

Production of Popular Native Wines in the Philippines

 

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19 Comments
cutedrishti8, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

Nice one to share..Great work..

Goodselfme, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

I learned so much from your well written info. tx

BluSphere, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

Interesting :) I liked it !

lindalulu, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

I have heard of a few of these wines like dandelion,elderberry but never carrot or parsnip…great article!

Christine Ramsay, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

You take me back to when we were first married. We often made wine then and our favourite was elderberry, though it was a bit dry so we mixed it with a sparking apple wine. It was delicious. I am getting the urge to make wine again. Great work.

Christine

Lex92, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

Hmm.. The Mead sounds it’d be a good try in a couple of years :) Marijuana though… I dont think that’d be a particularily good tasting wine… but I guess you never know… Great write :)

MMV Abad, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

The wine from marijuana is something :)

Juancav, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

Weird raw materials to make wine,nice pic.

Joe Dorish, posted this comment on Sep 2nd, 2009

Cool info! Have had honey and dandelion wine but did not know you could make wine from the rest especially marijuana.

Yovita Siswati, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

Woooww…I cannot imagine those vegetables being made as wine! I wonder how it tasted. Great research Nobert.

Hampers, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

I love grape wine. Your have posted wonderful picture that is appreciated. Keep it up the good work.

Anne Lyken Garner, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

This really surprised me. Well, you learn something new every day. I thought that of all the produce here, carrot wine was the most bizarre. I don’t know why…

Judy Sheldon, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

Being a prison guard, I knew about potato wine, as you have to be careful to keep an eye out for that (the homemade version is called spud juice), and I’ve heard of dandelion and elderberry, but the rest are news to me. Good write with lots of interesting pictures. Thanks & God bless.

Melody SJAL, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

Interesting and informative…unique wine sources indeed.

PR Mace, posted this comment on Sep 3rd, 2009

I did not know you could make wine from so many different things. Very interesting article. Well written, Nobert.

Eunice Tan, posted this comment on Sep 4th, 2009

Very informative

Mr Ghaz, posted this comment on Sep 6th, 2009

WoW!..such a great and well presented article..a very informative and well written piece..Beautiful pics as well..Well done my friend. I LOVED IT!..thanks so much for sharing this “extreme superb stuff.”

K Kristie, posted this comment on Sep 25th, 2009

I didn’t realize that wine can be made from so many sources. Great post!

edwin bashi, posted this comment on Feb 1st, 2011

BUenas tardes… estoy interesado en proveer miel de yacon a clientes peruanos… a ellos les interesa la producida en USA… me gustaria saber las ofertas, asicomo datos estadisticos… produccion anual o mensual… promedio de uso de materia prima… asi como lugares de produccion… de preferencia en usa

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